5 Reasons Not To Be On Facebook

By Rahul Desai on 27 Jan, 2011. Topics: Social Media, Opinion, Facebook, Lifestyle, Video . Comments: 40

Being a Social Media-addict, it's never easy finding reasons to  NOT like Facebook, or sorts. There've been really strong reasons, however, behind writing this article. We all 'Facebook' for a reason or the other. But there may be many others, why we should not.

Earlier today, I was going through a photo-album and ‘tagging’ people. (That’s what we’re supposed to do, right? ‘Tag Faces’? ‘Face’ book?) So I did. To my surprise, I could recognize two extremely opposite sets of people:

  • People that I never imagined would use a computer, were on Facebook. (I wouldn’t have imagined this, say, five years ago. But not anymore. They’re quite active. They do ‘like’ my comments and photos off and on. They’re very much here to stay.)
  • People that could be on Facebook weren’t really there.
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Original, Originality, et al.

By Rahul Desai on 07 Dec, 2010. Topics: Opinion, Blogging . Comments: 9

How to produce original content? As an amateur blogger, like millions others, I must find the answer to this burning question.

In my recent conversation with someone very close and frank to me, I got an honest feedback that my last few articles weren’t so charismatic as he had expected them to be. I couldn't blame him. I was so indulged in the urge of writing something – absolutely anything to start with, that I partially (or fully?) failed to justify the topic. But what else could I have possibly done?

I have picked information from forwarded emails, anonymous quotes, newspapers and books to write inspired articles in the past. Many of them were gladly received, liked and commented on. But did I really deserve that? At least I wasn’t satisfied. And when I managed to break out of the shell, it had a direct and much tougher competition with my own writing of the past.

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Delhi 6

By Rahul Desai on 26 Oct, 2010. Topics: City, India, People, Delhi, Bollywood, Review, Movie . Comments: 12

Director(s): Rakeysh Omprakash Mehra/ Acto(s): Abhishek Bachchan, Sonam Kapoor, Om Puri, Waheeda Rahman, Rishi Kapoor, Divya Dutta

I finally started living in my new (rented) apartment in Bangalore, with no great movie to look for on TV (not sure if I should blame TataSky for that). The only option was to re-explore my old DVD collection. No rewards for guessing, I picked Delhi 6 – one of my all-time favorite movies (as most of my closest people already know). I loved it so much the first time I watched it, I immediately bought its DVD and happen to have watched it more than once (being modest).

While I’m about to watch it (n+1)th time today, the only question running on my mind is – why would anyone not like Delhi 6? That’s a question for those to answer who can’t appreciate this phenomenal creation. I belong to the proud-others, who’re sane enough to understand and digest its perfection.

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Home Is Everything

By Rahul Desai on 13 Oct, 2010. Topics: Home, City, Poona / Pune, Bangalore / Bengaluru . Comments: 13

Yet another absurd title, considering what I’m planning to write about. I still hope it’s justified (by itself) by the end. I started 'typing' this article back in mid-2006 (on July 2, 2006 - to be precise). Not sure what stopped me from completing and publishing, I guess I had to move to Bangalore to realize the need.

Talking of the background, I thought of writing over this whole ‘home’ context soon after I happened to watch two of the greatest Hollywood movies in a very short span of time – Syriana and Munich (thanks to Pushkar’s keen interest and faith in Hollywood). They’re independently great movies with very limited things in common. One thing that attracted all my attention though, was the element of ‘Terrorism’ and its aspects portrayed in them.

Syriana showed the ‘making’ of individuals turned to terrorists, while Munich briefly discussed why one would take the tough road of terrorism – that would lead to a life full of hatred, violence, blood and painful struggle. In one of the scenes in Munich (not so surprisingly – a Steven Spielberg movie), one of ‘those’ guys tells Avner (the lead actor – Eric Bana) how ‘they’ did it all for home and how they were willing to continue and stay away from home for centuries to follow – just to ‘save’ their Home from the ‘bad’. He concludes with saying ‘…after all, Home – is everything!’ and Avner – fighting the terrorists – is speechless.  Anyway.

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Propeller Confessions

By Rahul Desai on 06 Oct, 2010. Topics: Technology, Airport, Travel . Comments: 13

Ever tried locating your house from an airplane approaching your ‘home’ airport? I’ve tried that. I do that. EVERY TIME. While taking off. Landing. Hovering. And fail to find anything. EVERY TIME. I can't even locate/recognize a specific area, let alone a building or a 'house'.

Talking in Facebook terms, 'this is on my mind right now' while on my way to Bangalore in a Propeller (as the airline people usually address those smaller 'Commercial Carriers' from the French Company ATR - Avions de Transport Régional. For any other person, it would be that fan-like part of an aircraft that helps the plane to move forward – cutting the air.) Apparently, I didn't know much about a Propeller all this while – that being 'the only other thing on my mind'.

With my recently improved Time Management, I was at the airport at 4:20 AM for a 6:15 AM flight (that's considered well-in-advance in Pune). All my 'advanced planning' and 'preparation' went in vain when one of my closest friends working at the airport arranged direct entry, pre-checkin, quick security check, lounge access – all of this in less than 15 mins. I had an hour and a half to observe and enjoy the recently 'upgraded' Pune Lohegaon Airport. That's not the subject here though, but certainly a good one for a separate article. Pipelined.

So, the Lounge coffees, sandwich and call for boarding! We actually walked down to the aircraft - an aircraft that looked more like an aerospace-project for a prodigy science student. There were reasons -

  • We decided to take a walk (instead of a shuttle). I didn't know that was allowed for pax.
  • 'The Sun' (didn't that sound like Jet Lee's 'The One'?) was yet to rise.
  • I realized I hadn't taken a walk at that time of the day (outside my house, of course) in long time.
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The One Minute Apology

By Dr. Bharat Desai on 27 Sep, 2010. Topics: Book, Life, People, Review . Comments: 0

Author: Ken Blanchard, Margret McBride/ Publisher: William Morrow/ ISBN: 9780688169817

Dr Bharat Desai's review of "The One Minute Apology" by Ken Blanchard and Margret McBride:

  • A powerful way to make things better.
  • A manipulative technique for getting what you want.
  • A power of forgiveness to improve or repair relationships, your business and even your home.

This is a rare book exploring a very important subject – poorly understood and hardly bothered. I will start with the most important issue that is,

  1. “The toughest part of Apologizing is realizing and admitting that you were wrong.”
  2. The power of the one minute apology is deeper that just words.
  3. The core of most problems is the truth you don’t want to face.
  4. The longer you wait to apologize, the sooner your weakness is perceived as wickedness.
  5. Without changed in your behavior just saying “I am Sorry” is not enough.
  6. Apologize not for outcome, but because you know you were wrong and it is the right thing to do.
  7. When you honestly express your feelings with someone you care about, you show respect for yourself and the relationship.
  8. A one minute apology can be an effective way to correct a mistake you have made and restore the trust needed for a good relationship.

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Train To Pakistan

By Arthi Audiseshan on 08 Aug, 2010. Topics: Fiction, India, Book, Romance, Pakistan, Review . Comment: 1

Author: Khushwant Singh/ Publisher: Grove Press/ ISBN: 9780802132215

Arthi's back to pen her thoughts down and so is Train to Pakistan - one of my long-loved books. Here's a guest post, the book review of Train to Pakistan. 

Although I have read a lot of books since I was 10, this is my first book review. Thanks to Rahul who inspired (read as forced) me into this one ;)

Train to Pakistan is a book based on the partition of India Pakistan right after India's independence. It takes us to the summer of 1947 to Mano Majra, a tiny village in Punjab. The partition means almost nothing to the local villagers and all is well between the sikh farmers and muslim tenants of the village until the local money lender Ram Lal is murdered. Jugga and the England returned social activist become the prey of Punjab police. The heavy drama shifts drastically when an east-bound train makes an unplanned stop at Mano Majra, coaches full of corpses. The flabbergasted villagers have not yet accepted the truth when reality slaps them once again when Sutlej floods from neighboring village. Action paces on as the magistrate, Jugga, Iqbal (the social activist) and village heads try to tackle the revolting violence. Also, the attitude of local police and niggling government officials is very nicely portrayed. The end however leaves a lot of open threads. Once I was about 4 - 5 pages away from the end, I was keen to know how will he end the series of misfortunes in the village. Frankly I was a bit disappointed since I was expecting something out of Mr. Iqbal as well. But to sum it up, Mr. Singh's eye to detail makes it a total page turner. Train to Pakistan gets a "Must Read" tag.

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